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Special Issue CfP: Modernism’s Late Temporalities

Margaret Anderson once advertised ‘THE LITTLE REVIEW IS IMMORTAL’ and suggested that readers should subscribe ‘If you want to keep eternally young’. Yet, for its final issue in 1929, Jane Heap counter-claimed that the ‘23 new systems of art’ the magazine had championed were ‘(all now dead)’. Hyperbole, sure, but the rapid swing between immortality and death speaks to some of the ways modernism has been characterised as late before it even began.

What is the connection between lateness, time and modernity? For a movement supposedly thrusting into the future at frenetic speed modernism was also mired in belatedness, untimeliness, decadence and late style. 

‘Late modernism’ is bound up in myriad temporalities that this issue of the Modernist Review would like to explore. We’re looking for reviews, articles, archival finds, poetry, creative responses & more on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Temporality

  • Ageing & late-life creativity

  • Late works

  • Late modernism

  • Late stye (& its discontents)

  • Contemporary writers influenced by modernism

  • Periodisation (and its potential problems)

  • Expanding boundaries (disciplinary, temporal, experimental)

  • Intergenerational modernism

TMR is delighted to announce a special issue themed around modernism’s late temporalities, guest edited by Jade French. Articles for TMR should be around 1000 words and be written in a clear, easily digestible style. You can read our full submission guidelines here. If you have any thoughts or questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Please send an abstract of no more than 100 words to Jade at lew778@qmul.ac.uk by 4th May.

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