Nearly Carbon Neutral Conferences (Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #4)

‘The first conference in the Western tradition was carbon neutral.’

We are excited to bring you the final instalment in our dialogues on online teaching. In our February issue, Lee Skallerup Bessette started us off with her timely reflection on ‘Teaching Online in Extraordinary Times‘, sparking a conversation between teachers and researchers finding ways to maintain, thrive, or gracefully admit defeat from behind the screen. Last week, Cai Lyons, Laura Biesiadecki and Paul Thifault shared their practical pedagogical advice; this week, Gareth Mills discusses his thoughts on why online might – and should – be the new normal for the academic conferencing arena. Continue reading “Nearly Carbon Neutral Conferences (Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #4)”

Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #3

We’re thrilled to continue our dialogue on online pedagogy with these two pieces. In our February issue, Lee Skallerup Bessette kicked off the dialogue with her piece ‘Teaching Online in Extraordinary Times,’ and the next week’s dialogue pieces, by Alexander Jones and Sean Michael Morris, reflected on the need for resilience and the paradoxical importance of knowing when to admit defeat. This week’s trio of responses, by Cai Lyons, Laura Biesiadecki and Paul Thifault, discuss specific pedagogical practices and tools that might make teaching in the upcoming weeks and months that bit more fruitful.

Continue reading “Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #3”

Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #2

We are delighted to share two further responses in our conversation on online pedagogies. In last month’s issue, Lee Skallerup Bessette kicked off the dialogue with her piece ‘Teaching Online in Extraordinary Times,’ and Naomi Milthorpe and Jessamy Perriam reflected on the importance of trying to make connections, and keeping pedagogy simple, in these testing times. These next two responses, by Alexander Jones and Sean Michael Morris, reflect on the need for resilience and the paradoxical importance of knowing when to admit defeat.

Continue reading “Teaching Online Dialogue: Responses #2”

Teaching Online in Extraordinary Times

Lee Skallerup Bessette, Georgetown University 

This is, to put it mildly, not business-as-usual, not normal. These are not “ideal learning conditions” for anyone, faculty, staff, or students. These actions that we are undertaking, to wholesale move entire campuses’ worth of courses from in-person to distance learning, is unprecedented. We are all under tremendous stress and pressure to try and make what seemed like it would be impossible, not just possible, but effective. 

Continue reading “Teaching Online in Extraordinary Times”

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